Traditional and unique nonprofit fundraising ideas gain popularity

According to an article from the Philanthropy Journal, the spirit of charity is truly alive in the U.S., as seen in the results of a study entitled “Key Facts on U.S. Foundations” by the Foundation Center. While many foundations are happy to accept any amount, many people would prefer to donate larger amounts to these institutions but may not have the resources or the know-how to accomplish that goal. As such, here are a few nonprofit fundraising tips for people looking for ways to donate a little more to the charitable institution of their choice:

Timeless classics
There is a reason bake sales and other traditional fundraisers are used over and over again—they work. Try to add something new to these timeless fundraisers, such as specializing in one product or offer customers “unfinished” cupcakes (no frosting) for them to decorate themselves.

The penalty card
At the next big event, why not handcuff people together and mention they can stay that way for the next thirty minutes or they can give a donation to have the cuffs removed immediately? You can also accept donations given with the request to handcuff certain people together. Penalty fundraisers are a great way to have a little unconventional, but good-natured fun with fundraising. Don’t forget to ask permission from the organizers about applying some mild but mock extortion on these possible donors.

Selling online
Collectors and restorers often go by the axiom, “one man’s junk is another man’s treasure.” By selling some of your “junk” in the house, you can easily raise a few hundred dollars to contribute to your cause. In addition, some of these sites offer a built-in nonprofit fundraising option, such as the eBay Giving Works program where a portion of your sale is immediately donated to a charity of the seller’s choice.

(from U.S. Foundation giving reaches an estimated $50.9 billion in 2012, The Philanthropy Journal)

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